A seamless tapestry of music and sound.

Archive for July, 2011

Symphonie Diagonale


A film made in 1924 by Eggeling that experiments with film as a means of expression.

Symphone Diagonale, the emphasis is on objectively analyzed movement rather than expressiveness on the surface pattering of lines into clearly defined movements, controlled by a mechanical, almost metronomic tempo. The spatial complexities and ambiguities are almost non-existent here. Above all, a sober quality of ryhthm articulation remains the most pronounced quality of the film…” (Standish Lawder, “Structuralism and Movement in Experimental Film and Modern Art, 1896-1921). Paper cut-outs and then tin foil figures were photographed a frame at a time. Completed in 1924, the film was shown for the first time (privately) on November 5. On May 3, 1925 it was presented to the public in Germany; sixteen days later Eggeling died in Berlin.  Upon first viewing Symphonie Diagonale, it is even difficult to perceive a beginning or an end. There is no story, no personality, but only a constant shifting of pattern upon pattern inside an undefined space, like the universe itself. According to Moholy-Nagy, Eggeling was “the first to discover the all-prevailing, revolutionary importance of an esthetic of time in film.” By building his animation from a musical foundation, Eggeling prepared the future for animators to come.

I took this silent film and put music and sound effects to it. Viking Eggeling experimented with film as a means of expression, adding a dimension that is inaccessible to the artist as a painter: time. I wrote an underneath piece of music that was stable throughout with hardly a beginning or end, inserting musical instruments and sound effects that represented the different geometrical shapes in the film. To me, the music tries to put place you into the film with no concept of time.

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The Harbor by Jean Metzinger


from the Coastlines Exchibit at the DMA

This is an original sound design created by UT Dallas student Roxanne Minnish for a painting by Jean Metzinger.  It was part of a multilayer sound installation in the Dallas Museum of Art exhibition Coastlines: Images of Land and Sea.  Visit www.dallasmuseumofart.org/View/Coastlines/index.htm to learn more about the exhibition.  Visit www.framemuseums.org to learn more about the sound installation project on the FRAME website (French Regional and American Museum Exchange).

Overcome


A UDK interactive game designed by a graduate class at The University of Texas at Dallas.

A UDK interactive project by graduate students at UT Dallas in an Immersive Environments class. Each room was designed with a “fear” in mind to overcome in order to travel through the maze to the end.  Each room represented an anxiety of each student in the class.  In the “words” room, the students were recorded speaking words that meant something to them.  Select words were put together to give you an unsettling environment, a room that might give you some kind of anxiety.  You then travel through the “heights” room, “sharps” room and finally the “telephone” room.  Enjoy!

Level Designer – Carlos Garcia
Producer/Assets – Corey McKemy
Sound Designer – Roxanne Minnish
Documentation – Harold Pan
Modeling & Texturing – Ignacio Peraldi

“Foolin Around” – Music and Sound Design by Roxanne Minnish



This film was done by students from The University of Texas at Dallas, Texas A&M and AIB – Bonn, Germany. Music and Sound Design by Roxanne Minnish. I had to “watch” this film several times before coming up with music that would fit this theme.

Voo Doo, Music and Sound Design by Roxanne Minnish



This film was done by a graduate animation class at The University of Texas of Dallas. Music and sound design by Roxanne Minnish.

Bathers by John Marin


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This piece was in the Coastlines exhibit at the Dallas Museum of Art April 25 – August 22, 2010. This painting was part of the modernist movement.  In Bathers, you find fragmented forms of women bathing nude on the beach.  As quoted by Marin, “I demand of them [paintings] that they are related to experiences.  I demand of them that they have the story — embracing these with the all over demand that they have the music of themselves as beautiful — forms — lines — and paint on beautiful paper of canvas.”

I tried to capture the experience of an afternoon at the beach with friends, trying to do something that wasn’t a popular practice, sunbathing in the nude.  The rhythm of the piece suggests the feelings and reponses to this environment.  The subjects of Marin’s art can be understood in the context of early twentieth-century American culture.  You will hear the music of the harp and english horn, trying to define the music and form of the beautiful figures and lines in the painting.