A seamless tapestry of music and sound.

Archive for the ‘Art’ Category

Rose Hall of Birds


Rose Hall of Birds

I wrote this music for the Perot Museum of Nature and Science’s Rose Hall of Birds. Undergraduate students from The University of Texas at Dallas composed MusicScapes for the other eleven galleries. This project began in January of this year. The students have worked very hard over the past eleven months. I am so proud of them!

The new Perot Museum of Nature and Science opens December 1st: http://www.perotmuseum.org/
Visitors will be able to hear in the 12 galleries the MusicScapes created by:
Josh Casey
AJ Magallanez
Roxanne Minnish
Yaseen Benhalim
Derrick Dugan
Charles McCormick

Symphonie Diagonale


A film made in 1924 by Eggeling that experiments with film as a means of expression.

Symphone Diagonale, the emphasis is on objectively analyzed movement rather than expressiveness on the surface pattering of lines into clearly defined movements, controlled by a mechanical, almost metronomic tempo. The spatial complexities and ambiguities are almost non-existent here. Above all, a sober quality of ryhthm articulation remains the most pronounced quality of the film…” (Standish Lawder, “Structuralism and Movement in Experimental Film and Modern Art, 1896-1921). Paper cut-outs and then tin foil figures were photographed a frame at a time. Completed in 1924, the film was shown for the first time (privately) on November 5. On May 3, 1925 it was presented to the public in Germany; sixteen days later Eggeling died in Berlin.  Upon first viewing Symphonie Diagonale, it is even difficult to perceive a beginning or an end. There is no story, no personality, but only a constant shifting of pattern upon pattern inside an undefined space, like the universe itself. According to Moholy-Nagy, Eggeling was “the first to discover the all-prevailing, revolutionary importance of an esthetic of time in film.” By building his animation from a musical foundation, Eggeling prepared the future for animators to come.

I took this silent film and put music and sound effects to it. Viking Eggeling experimented with film as a means of expression, adding a dimension that is inaccessible to the artist as a painter: time. I wrote an underneath piece of music that was stable throughout with hardly a beginning or end, inserting musical instruments and sound effects that represented the different geometrical shapes in the film. To me, the music tries to put place you into the film with no concept of time.

The Harbor by Jean Metzinger


from the Coastlines Exchibit at the DMA

This is an original sound design created by UT Dallas student Roxanne Minnish for a painting by Jean Metzinger.  It was part of a multilayer sound installation in the Dallas Museum of Art exhibition Coastlines: Images of Land and Sea.  Visit www.dallasmuseumofart.org/View/Coastlines/index.htm to learn more about the exhibition.  Visit www.framemuseums.org to learn more about the sound installation project on the FRAME website (French Regional and American Museum Exchange).

Bathers by John Marin


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This piece was in the Coastlines exhibit at the Dallas Museum of Art April 25 – August 22, 2010. This painting was part of the modernist movement.  In Bathers, you find fragmented forms of women bathing nude on the beach.  As quoted by Marin, “I demand of them [paintings] that they are related to experiences.  I demand of them that they have the story — embracing these with the all over demand that they have the music of themselves as beautiful — forms — lines — and paint on beautiful paper of canvas.”

I tried to capture the experience of an afternoon at the beach with friends, trying to do something that wasn’t a popular practice, sunbathing in the nude.  The rhythm of the piece suggests the feelings and reponses to this environment.  The subjects of Marin’s art can be understood in the context of early twentieth-century American culture.  You will hear the music of the harp and english horn, trying to define the music and form of the beautiful figures and lines in the painting.

Soundscapes at the Dallas Museum of Art


This project was done with a graduate class at The University of Texas at Dallas and the Dallas Museum of Art in May of 2009.  Pieces of art were selected by the museum. Students chose pieces that interested them to write a soundscape.  I was fortunate enough to do ten soundscapes.  I believe that soundscapes add to art.  Sometimes you “hear” something that you may not have “seen” looking at a painting.  Give this a try.  Go through this gallery of art with your sound muted.  Go through it again with you sound turned up.  Does it make a difference in how you view the piece?